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As a fellow Lab member we invite you to offer the Landscape team your input. Particularly around the following categories:  Learning and collaboration Could you please look at the areas of interest for learning & collaboration expressed by the Landscape leads and contribute by sharing relevant existing initiatives, potential partners, key lessons learned or tools to support the Landscape development. Feasibility Please assess the feasibility of this program in particular the robustness of the theory of change and the risk/opportunities of the enabling environment in the area (political leadership /government interest, enabling policy, institutional and legal framework, land tenure status, ease of doing business, level of information; Strategic value What is for you the strategic value of this Landscape program? What make it attractive ? What is the financial potential? Next steps How would you like to be involved in the next steps of this Landscape development?
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Vietnam Mekong Delta

Vietnam is currently the second largest rice exporter. By 2030, rising sea levels in the delta and changes in temperature and precipitation patterns would expose 45% of the land to extreme salinization, and crop damage with rice productivity falling by 9%. Rice farming has impacted on both soil, underground water and freshwater availability. The extraction of ground water leads to reduction in availability of groundwater, further contributing to inundation of the deltas. Excessive use of fertilisers, pesticides have polluted waterways, affecting the biodiversity in critical wetland habitats.

Landscape description

The Mekong Delta produces about 60% of rice and 40% of aquaculture for Vietnam. While the proportion of agriculture in GDP has been reduced, it still plays an important role for the country. Rice farming and aquaculture are the most impacted agricultural activities on ecosystems and key conservation targets including wetlands, mangrove forests, underground water and freshwater and soil biodiversity and birds.

In aquaculture, a steady stream of organic waste, chemicals and antibiotics from shrimp farms can pollute groundwater or coastal estuaries. Salt from the ponds can also seep into groundwater and onto agricultural land. This has lasting effects, changing the hydrology that provides the foundation of wetland ecosystems. Reservoirs or public ponds are turned into brackish water and polluted by discharged water from shrimp farms. Untreated waste from shrimp farming with high level of organic residues from fish food pollute the surrounding water and habitats along coastal areas. Ground water level is reduced where shrimp farms are set up in sandy areas. Intensive shrimp farming has high disease risks and can be spread easily to other areas through birds.

Country

Mekong Delta in Southern Vietnam

Contact organisation

WWF Vietnam 

Local landscape lead

Phuong Nguyen Thi Thanh

Main partners

Possible HD Bank, Minh Phu, Tan Vuong, others to be identified

Total area (ha)

3,900,000

Overall goal

Viet Nam's forests and landscapes are resilient, benefit biodiversity, enhance ecosystem services, and improve the quality of life for all.

Expected impacts

FW1: By 2030, the large- scale natural processes that created and are sustaining the natural morphology and ecosystem integrity of key deltas and river basins in Viet Nam are protected or restored.W1: By 2030, the large- scale natural processes that created and are sustaining the natural morphology and ecosystem integrity of key deltas and river basins in Viet Nam are protected or restored.

FW2: By 2025, businesses in targeted sectors (textile, agriculture, aquaculture etc.) and key partnerships have engaged in addressing water risks and in developing business production standards that embrace water and river stewardship principles.

FD1: By 2025, water quality and ecosystem connectivity in key buffer area of critical wetland areas and other wetland area in MD are improved through application of ASC and AIP and ecosystem restoration practices by shrimp and pangasius producers.

OC1: By 2025, Yellowfin tuna fisheries will complete the Fisheries Improvement Project

OC2: By 2025, Three MPAs have improved their management capacity, including capacity to manage plastics waste

FD1: By 2025, water quality and ecosystem connectivity in key buffer area of critical wetland areas and other wetland area in MD are improved through application of ASC and AIP and ecosystem restoration practices by shrimp and pangasius producers.

FD2: By 2025, the market share of Vietnamese sustainable products in global and domestic markets is increased to foster adoption of environment- friendly production practices.

FD3: By 2025, impacts from rice production on water resources in at least 2 key wetlands and in MD landscape is reduced

CEP2: By 2025, favourable policies, regulations and financing conditions are in place to incentivize key sectors (i.e. textile & garment, food and wood processing, buildings/construction, mobility) to adopt RE & EE

PL1: By 2024, key stakeholders and general public in Viet Nam are more aware and informed of plastic waste impact on the marine environment and feasible actions to create changes.

PL2: By 2025, 10 critical sites in Viet Nam, including 3 MPAs have championed in becoming plastic smart with clear action plans.

PL3: By 2025, business sectors are actively engaged in plastic waste reduction and implement business innovations to reduce plastic waste

PL4: By 2025, government policy framework is enhanced and legal enforcement on plastic waste management is strengthened

Threats

  • Illegal cutting;
  • Lack of law enforcement;
  • Infrastructure development;
  • Unsustainable natural forest use and degradation due to illegal logging and illegal collection of wood and non-timber forest (NTFP) products;
  • Smallholder encroachment, commercial agribusiness, infrastructure development and illegal logging;
  • Lack of clear regulations and resources for monitoring and enforcement;
  • Disaggregated planning; liquidity gap;
  • A lack of technical capacity at the provincial level to ensure high quality seedlings;
  • Threats of crop damage from storms and pestilent epidemic diseases; forest certification costs;
  • Domestic harvesting of timber and wood products is both unsustainable and insufficient to meet demand;
  • High imports

Landscape approach

Catchment/basin management

Commodities

Rice, aquaculture, energy, fresh water, textile, climate change

Related Sector

----

Global brands present

Lead institution

Budget

No answer chosen

Current sources of funding

Expected sources of funding

Proposed priority programs or sectors

(1) Aquaculture & Rice

(2) Energy

(3) Climate Change

(4) Fresh water

(5) Textile

Map

Support needed

edited on 8th January 2021, 12:01 by Deesha Chandra
Deesha Chandra

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